New Research: Hydrological Consequences of Shrub Encroachment

A number of Jornada researchers, led by Dr. Enrique R. Vivoni, recently published a new paper in Hydrological Processes. The research group sought to understand how variations in grassland to shrubland transitions might influence ecohydrology. To address this, Vivoni and a group of undergraduate and graduate students established research catchments in the Jornada Experimental Range …

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Now Accepting Applications: Jornada LTER Graduate Fellowship

The Jornada Basin LTER provides support for half-time, 12 month (up to $24,000/y) and summer research fellowships (up to $6000/summer) for graduate students conducting research directly related to the goals of the Jornada LTER. Graduate Research Fellows may be eligible for up to 2 years (halftime) or 2 summers of support, for students in good …

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Now Accepting Applications: Research Experience for Undergraduates

The Jornada Basin LTER has funding to support a modest number of undergraduate research (JRN-REU) fellowships each summer. Students will work with mentors associated with JRN-LTER or NMSU on research related to Jornada LTER research themes.  For details and application instructions regarding the 2021 REU program, please see the flier and application form. Applications are due …

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Navigating the Jornada Data Ecosystem

The Jornada generates a wealth of ecological data collected at sites across the Jornada Experimental Range. This video, created by members of the Information Management team, discusses Jornada research data principles, key available datasets, current (and future) data management systems, how to utilize data, and how to contribute data. Click here to download powerpoint slides.

Soil Isotopic Memory of C4 Grasses

Dr. Curtis Monger’s and his former student Jiaping Wang’s research explored the use of carbon isotopes in the soil to understand what vegetation may have looked like in the past. Below is a presentation of this work from the recent Jornada Symposium.